Tag Archives: american culture

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Stranger Than Fiction
Gail Lukasik
White Like Her

Libby Hellmann will interview author Gail Lukasik, a mystery author who has published a non-fiction book about the biggest mystery of all – her own family.

After an appearance on the PBS show Genealogy Roadshow, Lukasik found herself searching for the family of her mother she never knew – the family her mother kept secret because they were black.

White Like Her: My Family’s Story of Race and Racial Passing
By Gail Lukasik
$22.99
Air Date/Time December 8, 3 pm CST
1st ed., hardcover, 316 p.

Gail’s journey of self-discovery and redemption begins with her appearance on PBS Genealogy Roadshow. Introducing herself with the words “I’m a mystery author who’s never been able to solve my own family mystery”, she learns in a very public way the very private history her mother kept secret.

In the historical context of the Jim Crow South, Gail explores her mother’s decision to “pass” as white, how she hid her secret even from her own husband, and the price she paid for choosing whiteness. Haunted by her mother’s fear and shame, Gail embarks on a quest to uncover her mother’s racial lineage, tracing her family back to eighteenth-century colonial Louisiana. In coming to...

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Stranger Than Fiction Final lsub

Stranger Than Fiction
Joan Marie Johnson
Funding Feminism

Paul Berlanga will interview author Joan Marie Johnson about her latest title,  Funding Feminism.

The story of how a few privileged (needless to say, white) women were able to make demands on the burgeoning Women’s Right’s Movement in exchange for money; why they chose to support the cause at all; what it meant for the Movement then and since are all discussed in this informative new work.

Order Your Signed Copy.

Funding Feminism:
Monied Women, Philanthropy, and the Women’s Movement, 1870–1967
by Joan Marie Johnson
$39.95
Air Date/Time: December 9, 12pm (Central)
320 pages, hardcover

How did a group of affluent white women beginning in the late nineteenth through the mid-twentieth centuries advance the status of all women? Through acts of philanthropy. This cadre of activists included Phoebe Hearst, the mother of William Randolph Hearst; Grace Dodge, granddaughter of Wall Street “Merchant Prince” William Earle Dodge; and Ava Belmont, who married into the Vanderbilt family fortune.

Motivated by their own experiences with sexism, and focusing on women’s need for economic independence, these benefactors sought to expand women’s access to higher education, promote suffrage, and champion reproductive rights – as well as to provide assistance to working-class women. In a time when women still wielded limited political power, philanthropy was perhaps the...

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