Tag Archives: American History

A House Divided Page Header

A House Divided
Paula Tarnapol Whitacre
A Civil Life in an Uncivil Time

A Civil Life in an Uncivil Time

Bjorn Skaptason interviewed Paula Tarnapol Whitacre about her new book, A Civil Life in an Uncivil Time: Julia Wilbur’s Struggle for Purpose.

Abandoning a sad yet safe life, Julia moves to Alexandria to become a relief agent in a Union hospital during the worst of the Civil War. Through Wilbur’s diary, Whitacre is able to show exactly how the times change us and we change them back.

Order Your Signed Copy.

A Civil Life in an Uncivil Time

A Civil Life in an Uncivil Time: Julia Wilbur’s Struggle for Purpose
By Paula Tarnapol Whitacre
$32.95
Air Date/Time September 28, 5pm (Central)
1st ed., 320  pages, hardcover

In the fall of 1862 Julia Wilbur left her family’s farm near Rochester, New York, and boarded a train to Washington DC. An ardent abolitionist, the forty-seven-year-old Wilbur left a sad but stable life, headed toward the chaos of the Civil War, and spent most of the next several years in Alexandria devising ways to aid recently escaped slaves and hospitalized Union soldiers.

A Civil Life in an Uncivil Time shapes Wilbur’s diaries and other primary sources into a historical narrative sending the reader back 150 years to understand a woman who was alternately brave, self-pitying, foresighted, petty—and all too human.

Paula Tarnapol Whitacre describes Wilbur’s experiences against the backdrop of Alexandria, Virginia,...

Learn More About the Book/Order

A House Divided Page Header

A House Divided
Louis Contey & Lawrence Grimm
The Heavens Are Hung in Black

The Heavens Are Hung in Black

Daniel Weinberg spoke with actor Lawrence Grimm (Abraham Lincoln) and director Louis Contey about The Heavens Are Hung in Black, staged by Shattered Globe Theatre.  They discuss their research; and the play’s relevance to today.

The Heavens Are Jung in BlackThe play explores the months between Willie Lincoln’s death and when Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation.

Lincoln in the Bardo
By George Saunders
$165.00 Signed First Edition
Air Date/Time March 2, 3:00pm (Central)
Re-air date: September 19th, 1 pm (Central)
cloth, 368p, cloth, dj.

Winner of the 2017 Man Booker Prize

The long-awaited first novel from the author of Tenth of December, this moving and original father-son story features none other than Abraham Lincoln, as well as an unforgettable cast of supporting characters, living and dead, historical and invented. 

February 1862. The Civil War is less than one year old. The fighting has begun in earnest, and the nation has begun to realize it is in for a long, bloody struggle. Meanwhile, President Lincoln’s beloved eleven-year-old son, Willie, lies upstairs in the White House, gravely ill. In a matter of days, despite predictions of a recovery, Willie dies and is laid to rest in...

Learn More About the Book/Order

 

Act of Justice: Lincoln’s Emancipation Proclamation
and the Law of War
By Burrus M. Carnahan
$50
Air Date/Time September 19, 2016 1pm (Central)
216  pages, hardcover

In his first inaugural address, Abraham Lincoln declared that as president he would “have no lawful right” to interfere with the institution of slavery. Yet less than two years later, he issued a proclamation intended to free all slaves throughout the Confederate states.
When critics challenged the constitutional soundness of the act, Lincoln pointed to the international laws and usages of war as the legal basis for his Proclamation, asserting that the Constitution invested the president “with the law of war in time of war.” As the Civil War intensified, the Lincoln administration slowly and reluctantly accorded full belligerent rights to the Confederacy under the law of war. This included...

Learn More About the Book/Order

A House Divided Page Header

A House Divided Welcomes
Mark Zwonitzer

The Statesman and the Storyteller

Due to a scheduling conflict, the author was unable to come to the show. We are selling the 1st edition copies; without the author’s signature.

Mark Zwonitzer’s The Statesman and the Storyteller examines the relationship between Mark Twain and John Hay.

Order Your 1st Edition Copy from Abraham Lincoln Book Shop, Inc.

The Statesman and the Storyteller

The Statesman and the Storyteller: John Hay, Mark Twain, and the Rise of American Imperialism
By Mark Zwonitzer
$35.00
Due to a scheduling conflict, the author was unable to come to the show.

We have 1st edition copies; without the author’s signature.

In a dual biography covering the last ten years of the lives of friends and contemporaries, writer Samuel Clemens (aka Mark Twain) and statesman John Hay (who served as secretary of state under presidents William McKinley and Theodore Roosevelt), The Statesman and the Storyteller not only provides an intimate look into the daily lives of these men but also creates an elucidating portrait of the United States on the verge of emerging as a world power.

And just as the narrative details the wisdom, and the occasional missteps, of two great men during a tumultuous...

Learn More About the Book/Order

 

A House Divided Page Header

A House Divided
James S. Pula
Under the Crescent Moon with the XI Corps

Bjorn Skaptason speaks with James S. Pula about Under the Crescent Moon with the Xi Corps in the Civil War Vol 1: From the Defense of Washington to Chancellorsville, 1862-63.

 

Re-examining the legendarily unlucky XIth, who marched under the badge of a crescent moon, to separate fact from myth.

Under the Crescent Moon with the XI Corps in the Civil War. Col 1: From the Defenses of Washington to Chancellorsville, 1862-63

by James S. Pula
$34.95
Air Date/Time December 1, noon CST
1st ed., 312, hardcover

The XI Corps served in the Army of the Potomac for just twelve months (September 1862-August 1863), during which it played a pivotal role in the critical battles of Chancellorsville and Gettysburg. Thereafter, the corps hastened westward to reinforce a Union army in besieged Chattanooga, and marched through brutal December weather without adequate clothing, shoes, or provisions to help rescue a second Northern army under siege in Knoxville, Tennessee. Despite its sacrifices in the Eastern campaigns and successes in Tennessee, the reputation of the XI Corps is one of cowardice and failure. James S. Pula sets the record straight in his two-volume study...

Learn More About the Book/Order

 

Stranger Than Fiction Final lsub

Stranger Than Fiction
Joan Marie Johnson
Funding Feminism

Paul Berlanga will interview author Joan Marie Johnson about her latest title,  Funding Feminism.

The story of how a few privileged (needless to say, white) women were able to make demands on the burgeoning Women’s Right’s Movement in exchange for money; why they chose to support the cause at all; what it meant for the Movement then and since are all discussed in this informative new work.

Order Your Signed Copy.

Funding Feminism:
Monied Women, Philanthropy, and the Women’s Movement, 1870–1967
by Joan Marie Johnson
$39.95
Air Date/Time: December 9, 12pm (Central)
320 pages, hardcover

How did a group of affluent white women beginning in the late nineteenth through the mid-twentieth centuries advance the status of all women? Through acts of philanthropy. This cadre of activists included Phoebe Hearst, the mother of William Randolph Hearst; Grace Dodge, granddaughter of Wall Street “Merchant Prince” William Earle Dodge; and Ava Belmont, who married into the Vanderbilt family fortune.

Motivated by their own experiences with sexism, and focusing on women’s need for economic independence, these benefactors sought to expand women’s access to higher education, promote suffrage, and champion reproductive rights – as well as to provide assistance to working-class women. In a time when women still wielded limited political power, philanthropy was perhaps the...

Learn More About the Book/Order