Tag Archives: racism

Stranger Than Fiction Final lsub

Stranger Than Fiction
Karen Cox
Goat Castle

Goat Castle

Bjorn Skaptason spoke with Karen Cox about Goat Castle.

Goat Castle tells the story of this local feud, killing, investigation, and trial, showing how a true crime tale of fallen southern grandeur and murder obscured an all too familiar story of racial injustice. Order Your Signed Copy.

Goat Castle

Goat Castle: A True Story of Murder, Race
and the Gothic South
by Karen Cox
$26.00
Air Date/Time October 4, 3:30pm (Central)
1st ed., 240p., cloth

The incredible true story of a murder, a mansion, madness… and goats.

In 1932, the city of Natchez, Mississippi was hit with an unexpected influx of journalists and tourists as the lurid story of a local murder was splashed across headlines nationwide. Two eccentrics, Richard Dana and Octavia Dockery—known in the press as the “Wild Man” and the “Goat Woman”—enlisted an African American man named George Pearls to rob their reclusive neighbor, Jennie Merrill, at her estate. During the attempted robbery, Merrill was shot and killed. The crime drew national coverage when it came to light that Dana and Dockery, the alleged murderers, shared their huge, decaying antebellum mansion with their...

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Stranger Than Fiction Final lsub

Stranger Than Fiction
Joan Marie Johnson
Funding Feminism

Paul Berlanga will interview author Joan Marie Johnson about her latest title,  Funding Feminism.

The story of how a few privileged (needless to say, white) women were able to make demands on the burgeoning Women’s Right’s Movement in exchange for money; why they chose to support the cause at all; what it meant for the Movement then and since are all discussed in this informative new work.

Order Your Signed Copy.

Funding Feminism:
Monied Women, Philanthropy, and the Women’s Movement, 1870–1967
by Joan Marie Johnson
$39.95
Air Date/Time: December 9, 12pm (Central)
320 pages, hardcover

How did a group of affluent white women beginning in the late nineteenth through the mid-twentieth centuries advance the status of all women? Through acts of philanthropy. This cadre of activists included Phoebe Hearst, the mother of William Randolph Hearst; Grace Dodge, granddaughter of Wall Street “Merchant Prince” William Earle Dodge; and Ava Belmont, who married into the Vanderbilt family fortune.

Motivated by their own experiences with sexism, and focusing on women’s need for economic independence, these benefactors sought to expand women’s access to higher education, promote suffrage, and champion reproductive rights – as well as to provide assistance to working-class women. In a time when women still wielded limited political power, philanthropy was perhaps the...

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