Tag Archives: slavery

A House Divided
Manisha Sinha
The Slave’s Cause

Bjorn Skaptason interviews author Manisha SInha about her new book The Slave’s Cause: A History of Abolitioncorrecting the sometimes stereotypical view of who Abolitionists were and how they fought for freedom.

Watch the live interview and submit a question to be asked on air. Order a signed book to be delivered to your door.

The Slave’s Cause: A History of Abolition
by Manisha Sinha
$37.50
Air Date/Time August 2, 3:00 pm (Central)
1st ed., 784 pages, hardcover, Yale University Press

A groundbreaking history of abolition that recovers the largely forgotten role of African Americans in the long march toward emancipation from the American Revolution through the Civil War.

Received historical wisdom casts abolitionists as bourgeois, mostly white reformers burdened by racial paternalism and economic conservatism. Manisha Sinha overturns this image, broadening her scope beyond the antebellum period usually associated with abolitionism and recasting it as a radical social movement in which men and women, black and white, free and enslaved found common ground in causes ranging from feminism and utopian socialism to anti-imperialism and efforts to defend the rights of labor. Drawing on extensive archival research, including newly discovered letters and...

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A House Divided
Graham Peck
Making An Anti-Slavery Nation

Making an Anti-Slavery Nation

Daniel Weinberg spoke with Graham Peck about Making An Anti-Slavery Nation: Lincoln, Douglas and the Battle over Freedom. 

Peck meticulously traces the conflict over slavery in Illinois. Presenting pathbreaking interpretations of Lincoln, Douglas, and the Civil War’s origins, Making an Antislavery Nation shows how battles over slavery paved the way for freedom’s triumph in America.

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Making an Anti-Slavery Nation

Making an Anti-Slavery Nation: Lincoln, Douglas and the
Battle Over Freedom
by Graham Peck
$34.95
Air Date/Time November 11, 12 Noon (Central)
1st ed., 288p., cloth

This sweeping narrative presents an original and compelling explanation for the triumph of the antislavery movement in the United States prior to the Civil War.

Abraham Lincoln’s election as the first antislavery president was hardly preordained. From the country’s inception, Americans had struggled to define slavery’s relationship to freedom. Most Northerners supported abolition in the North but condoned slavery in the South, while most Southerners denounced abolition and asserted slavery’s compatibility with whites’ freedom. On this massive political fault line hinged the fate of the nation.

Graham A. Peck meticulously traces the conflict over slavery in Illinois from the Northwest Ordinance in 1787 to Lincoln’s defeat of his arch-rival...

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