Tag Archives: women’s rights

Stranger Than Fiction
Joan Dejean
The Queen’s Embroiderer

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Paul Berlanga interviews author Joan Dejean about her latest historical treasure-hunt The Queen’s Embroiderer: A True Story of Paris, Lovers, Swindlers, and the First Stock Market Crisis.

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The Queen’s Embroiderer: A True Story of Paris, Lovers, Swindlers, and the First Stock Market Crisis
by Joan Dejean
$30.00
Air Date/Time: May 24, 12:30 pm (Central)
400 pages, hardcover

From the author of How Paris Became Paris, a sweeping history of high finance, the origins of high fashion, and a pair of star-crossed lovers in 18th-century France.

Paris, 1719. The stock market is surging and the world’s first millionaires are buying everything in sight. Against this backdrop, two families, the Magoulets and the Chevrots, rose to prominence only to plummet in the first stock market crash. One family built its name on the burgeoning financial industry, the other as master embroiderers for Queen Marie-Thérèse and her husband, King Louis XIV. Both patriarchs were ruthless money-mongers, determined to strike it rich by arranging marriages for their children.

But...

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Stranger Than Fiction
Joan Marie Johnson
Funding Feminism

Paul Berlanga interviewed author Joan Marie Johnson about her latest title,  Funding Feminism.

The story of how a few privileged (needless to say, white) women were able to make demands on the burgeoning Women’s Right’s Movement in exchange for money; why they chose to support the cause at all; what it meant for the Movement then and since are all discussed in this informative new work.

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Funding Feminism:
Monied Women, Philanthropy, and the Women’s Movement, 1870–1967
by Joan Marie Johnson
$39.95
Air Date/Time: December 9, 12pm (Central)
320 pages, hardcover

How did a group of affluent white women beginning in the late nineteenth through the mid-twentieth centuries advance the status of all women? Through acts of philanthropy. This cadre of activists included Phoebe Hearst, the mother of William Randolph Hearst; Grace Dodge, granddaughter of Wall Street “Merchant Prince” William Earle Dodge; and Ava Belmont, who married into the Vanderbilt family fortune.

Motivated by their own experiences with sexism, and focusing on women’s need for economic independence, these benefactors sought to expand women’s access to higher education, promote suffrage, and champion reproductive rights – as well as to provide assistance to working-class women. In a time when women still wielded limited political power, philanthropy was perhaps the...

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